November 30, 2012   123 notes
leprocrastinateur:

Van Laren D. Cycadeoidea ingens. 1910-1912. 
Source: ici.

leprocrastinateur:

Van Laren D. Cycadeoidea ingens. 1910-1912. 

Source: ici.

(via scientificillustration)

November 28, 2012   146 notes
coleoptera-kinbote:

Weaponized Goliath Beetle

coleoptera-kinbote:

Weaponized Goliath Beetle

(via scientificillustration)

November 28, 2012   200 notes

rhamphotheca:

Morphological Diversity and Phylogenetics of the Darter Etheostoma Subgenus Doration (Family Percidae), with Descriptions of Five New Species

Five new fish species were scientifically described last week, all after former or current U.S leaders who have records of environmental leadership and commitment. Three species are found in Tennessee, which already leads the nation in freshwater fish diversity with 315 species. These new species were formerly considered isolated populations of the wide-ranging Speckled Darter (Etheostoma stigmaeum) but are now recognized as distinct species based on morphology and male breeding colors.

 These new species are part of a group of darters (subgenus Doration) that are found throughout southeastern river drainages west of the Appalachians. The new species, described by Steve Layman at Geosyntec Consultants in Kennesaw GA and Rick Mayden at Saint Louis University MO, include  

Etheostoma obama, the Spangled Darter, found entirely within Tennessee;

Etheostoma gore, the Cumberland Darter and

Etheostoma jimmycarter, the Bluegrass Darter, both found in Tennessee and Kentucky; 

Etheostoma teddyroosevelt, the Highland Darter from the Ozark Plateau in Missouri, Arkansas, and the corners of Kansas and Oklahoma;

and  Etheostoma clinton, the Beaded Darter from the Ouachita Mountains in Arkansas.   

reference: Layman, S.R. & Mayden, R.L. (2012): Morphological Diversity and Phylogenetics of the Darter Subgenus Doration (Percidae: Etheostoma), with Descriptions of Five New Species. Bulletin of the Alabama Museum of Natural History. 30: 1–83.

http://tnaci.blogspot.com/2012/11/new-fishes-named-after-us-leaders-three.html

(via: NovaTaxa)

(via scientificillustration)

November 28, 2012   414 notes

(via scientificillustration)

November 26, 2012   39 notes

NME Photography Awards

owenrichards:

I was very flattered to be included in the 2012 NME photography awards exhibition at the Getty Images gallery in central London.

The original image is part of an editorial commission from Loud and Quiet on the Maccabees return to Brixton Academy.

The exhibition is on until 1st December.

November 23, 2012   74 notes
scientificillustration:

Okay so it’s not necessarily scientific.. 

Thanks for the submission CVWS

scientificillustration:

Okay so it’s not necessarily scientific.. 

Thanks for the submission CVWS

November 21, 2012   3 notes
Urban Noise Makes Flycatchers Change Length of Their Songs
Birds use their songs during social interactions to attract females and repel intruders. Factors affecting acoustic communication, such as urban noise, may therefore impair breeding success. Research to date has shown that several songbird (or oscine) species like robins, nightingales and blackbirds, adapt their song in response to noise.
They found that males occupying territories with relatively high noise levels produced longer songs, whereas males in quieter places sang both long and short songs. Males also showed song plasticity as they sang less versatile songs later in the morning when noise level was higher, but time of day seemed to play a more important role in driving this shift than did noise levels.

Urban Noise Makes Flycatchers Change Length of Their Songs

Birds use their songs during social interactions to attract females and repel intruders. Factors affecting acoustic communication, such as urban noise, may therefore impair breeding success. Research to date has shown that several songbird (or oscine) species like robins, nightingales and blackbirds, adapt their song in response to noise.

They found that males occupying territories with relatively high noise levels produced longer songs, whereas males in quieter places sang both long and short songs. Males also showed song plasticity as they sang less versatile songs later in the morning when noise level was higher, but time of day seemed to play a more important role in driving this shift than did noise levels.

November 21, 2012   398,910 notes

halotharfroggies:

paarthurnax-actually:

I fucking love this. The toad is about to be really sad, and then he’s so happy because someone thinks he’s lovely.

Oh you found a comic about me.

(via scoticus)

November 21, 2012   211 notes
atelierentomologica:



Moth and Butterflies
Surinomo print by Kubo Shunman, Japan C19

atelierentomologica:

Moth and Butterflies
Surinomo print by Kubo Shunman, Japan C19

(via scientificillustration)

November 21, 2012   6,040 notes

(Source: blackamulet, via scientificillustration)