December 23, 2011   10 notes
Picture: Haematite by Gemma Anderson.

I found a drawing of [haematoma] of the brain by R.Hooper which reminded  me so much of a particular haematite specimen I had seen at UCL and so I  decided to recreate the drawing of the brain(a zoological specimen)  with haematite (a mineral specimen) because of their anatomical  resemblances to one another.


Empa scientists mimic photosynthesis in photo-electrochemical cells using haematite and phycocyanin (a light-harvesting pigment used by blue-green algae, aka Lina Blue food coloring) electrodes. (Source)

There seems to be a delicate  balance where organic molecules not only survive harsh photocatalytic  conditions, but even convey an additional benefit to ceramic  photocatalysts: They double the photocurrent. This is a big step  forward.

Picture: Haematite by Gemma Anderson.

I found a drawing of [haematoma] of the brain by R.Hooper which reminded me so much of a particular haematite specimen I had seen at UCL and so I decided to recreate the drawing of the brain(a zoological specimen) with haematite (a mineral specimen) because of their anatomical resemblances to one another.

Haematite nanoparticle film (red) with functional phycocyanin network (green) attached. (Image by Dr. E. Vitol, Argonne National Laboratory)

Empa scientists mimic photosynthesis in photo-electrochemical cells using haematite and phycocyanin (a light-harvesting pigment used by blue-green algae, aka Lina Blue food coloring) electrodes. (Source)

There seems to be a delicate balance where organic molecules not only survive harsh photocatalytic conditions, but even convey an additional benefit to ceramic photocatalysts: They double the photocurrent. This is a big step forward.

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